Welcome!

Welcome to this latest attempt to connect librarians from west-central Wisconsin with each other! Please send in content (booklists, ideas, photos, etc.), and comment on posts so we can help each other. If you were using feedmyinbox to get new posts sent to you before, you'll need to switch to another service (blogtrottr works like feedmyinbox, googlereader is a good blog-reader to try).







Search This Blog

Friday, May 12, 2017

Scarcity--part 3


jar of coins
Lack of money can cause tunneling
This is the second in a series of posts about the book Scarcity:  Why Having Too Little Means So Much, by Sendhil Mullainathan (an economics professor at Harvard) and Eldar Shafir (a psychology and public affairs professor at Princeton).  Look here for a cool info-graphic visual summary of the book, created by Todd Clarke.  Here's a podcast where they talk about some of their findings.

If we think about how scarcity might be affecting the families we serve, we might make some meaningful tweaks to help make our programs and services more helpful and accessible for the people we most want to reach.

Remember that people who are experiencing scarcity are focused on the day-to-day.  Programs that are rigid are not always a good fit for them.  Coming to the library, or bringing a child to the library, is not inside the tunnel for most people who are struggling day-to-day to make ends meet or to find enough time in their day to sleep and eat.  It's important to think about that when planning programs, or thinking about your summer library program reading encouragements.  Can families participate whenever they can make it?  Is it possible for kids to participate and have access to books and even programs, even if getting to the library at a given time or date is impossible?  It is worthwhile to consider these questions, especially if we want to change the trend of people who may be most in need of the free resources we offer, having the hardest time accessing them.


Thursday, May 11, 2017

Scarcity--part 2

clock
The proverbial ticking clock!
This is the second in a series of posts about the book Scarcity:  Why Having Too Little Means So Much, by Sendhil Mullainathan (an economics professor at Harvard) and Eldar Shafir (a psychology and public affairs professor at Princeton).  Look here for a cool info-graphic visual summary of the book, created by Todd Clarke.  Here's a podcast where they talk about some of their findings.

This has implications for us in how we plan our work.  I'm guessing most of us, especially at this time of year, are a little beside ourselves with things to do.  We are planning and publicizing our summer programs, and trying to make the summer jam-packed with terrific offerings for kids, teens, and families in our communities.  It can make it hard to think big-picture. 


Consider building slack into your schedule.  It might seem silly to allow for any wiggle room when there is so much to be done, but if you leave a little space (don't schedule your meetings or programs back to back, leave a few hours free to catch up every week) you will be better able to accommodate unexpected changes  (a sick co-worker, a flooded bathroom, etc.) without getting hopelessly behind.  And if no unexpected changes happen (face it, have you ever had a week like that?) you will have a chance to use that time to get ahead on something, OR to think/reflect about bigger picture things.

In the book, they described situations where having slack in a schedule (having an assistant whose time is not always booked to the last minute) or a building (a busy hospital setting aside an operating room for emergency surgeries) actually made the system more efficient.  Think about that!

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Scarcity

Scarcity book cover
If you've had a conversation with me in the past month or so, you've probably heard me talking about a book I finally just finished called Scarcity:  Why Having Too Little Means So Much, by Sendhil Mullainathan (an economics professor at Harvard) and Eldar Shafir (a psychology and public affairs professor at Princeton).  Look here for a cool info-graphic visual summary of the book, created by Todd Clarke.  Here's a podcast where they talk about some of their findings.

The basic premise of the book is that when we are facing scarcity--of time or money, for instance--we use up significant cognitive resources just dealing with the most pressing issues.  We tunnel, which makes good sense and keeps us functioning in the present (it can even make us super-efficient and effective in the short-term).  Anything outside the tunnel, however, is necessarily disregarded.  In the long run, this can be problematic.  In fact, people's decision-making about long-term things is impaired, along with their general cognitive functioning--some studies even have shown that IQ is affected by managing scarcity, and it certainly makes some of the programs designed to serve people living in poverty less helpful.

I'm going to do a blog series about this--breaking this into a couple of bite-sized pieces.  Watch for more tomorrow and Friday!