Welcome!

Welcome to this latest attempt to connect librarians from west-central Wisconsin with each other! Please send in content (booklists, ideas, photos, etc.), and comment on posts so we can help each other. If you were using feedmyinbox to get new posts sent to you before, you'll need to switch to another service (blogtrottr works like feedmyinbox, googlereader is a good blog-reader to try).







Search This Blog

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Reading without Walls Campaign and Tool Kit


from Gene Yang's website
I'm a fan of Gene Luen Yang--I love his books, he's a terrific speaker, and I'm so glad he is the National Ambassador for Young People's Literature.  His platform is Reading without Walls--he is encouraging young people (and everyone, really) to read things they might not otherwise read:  books about people who look different from you, books about topics you don't know much about, books in formats you don't usually choose, and more.  He has compelling stories about why this is important, and there are some great resources out there to help you promote the idea (thanks to Patti in Durand for sending me that tip!)

So, are you reading outside your comfort zone?  What have you been reading?  I'm on a non-fiction kick lately, which is not my usual m.o.  How about you?


Monday, March 20, 2017

Calming Tip for Overwhelmed Kids

puppies playing tug of war
Puppies need heavy work, too!
I learned about the concept of "heavy work" when I was learning about autism and sensory processing issues.  It can be calming, and help kids organize their minds so they are ready to participate in whatever other learning activity is going on.  Heavy work is any kind of slow, steady resistance that requires a child to use their muscles.  Things like pushing on the wall, giving yourself a bear hug, marching with really heavy stomps--all of these allow for more input, which can have a calming affect.

There's a nice blog post about using heavy work, with some good examples of the kinds of things to try for various age groups.  This is another of those universal design things--it's great for kids with sensory processing issues, but good for everyone else, too!